How To Find and Bake With a DATEM Replacement

A DATEM replacement can mimic the effects, but are sourced from clean-label alternatives.

You want to make a clean-label product. But you also need reliable loaf volume, fine crumb structure and dough extensibility. You need a DATEM replacement.

Thankfully, food scientists are making that an easier ask than it used to be. Replacements are on the market that can mimic the effects of DATEM, but are sourced from clean-label alternatives.

These replacements are usually built with:

  • Emulsifiers: lecithin and soy emulsifiers
  • Enzymes: are naturally present in wheat flour and yeast. For DATEM replacement, lipase, xylanase and phospholipase have been noted as reliable replacers.
  • Lipids: can be added in the form of animal, vegetable fat or glycerides such as glycerol monostearate (GMS) – this ester is formed when glycerol is reacted with stearic acid.
  • Wheat protein isolate

How do these fit on my label?

Nutrition: Among improving the protein content, certain wheat protein isolates have the ability to decrease the amount of carbohydrates when utilized in a baked product.

Clean-label: Because enzymes denature during baking, they do not appear on the final product ingredient label. This can be considered clean baking to the consumer.

How do I bake with a DATEM replacement?

DATEM replacements can be applied in almost any baked good system to strengthen the gluten network in addition to improving the crumb structure and the volume of the final product. The use of lipase in any bread formulation can yield a finer crumb structure as well as slow the staling process.

DATEM replacers can also be utilized in gluten-free bread formulations to improve the lack of gluten structure and produce products with improved loaf volume and crumb structure. It can also be utilized in formulations that utilize other grains to improve the process and end product.

There have been studies that examine the complete replacement of DATEM with wheat protein isolate. In one study following the AACC Method 10-10.03 for the production of bread, when DATEM was completely replaced with a wheat protein isolate, the loaf volume and crumb quality scores were similar and no significant differences were observed. Additionally, the dough strength, elasticity and extensibility were improved and the mix time was reduced.

2018-12-10T05:21:27-07:00

About the Author:

Lin Carson, PhD
Dr. Lin Carson’s love affair with baking started over 25 years ago when she earned her BSc degree in Food Science & Technology at the Ohio State University. She went on to earn her MSc then PhD from the Department of Grain Science at Kansas State University. Seeing that technical information was not freely shared in the baking industry, Dr. Carson decided to launch BAKERpedia to cover this gap. Today, as the world’s only FREE and comprehensive online technical resource for the commercial baking industry, BAKERpedia is used by over half a million commercial bakers, ingredient sellers, equipment suppliers and baking entrepreneurs annually. You can catch Dr. Carson regularly on the BAKED In Science podcast solving baking problems or talking about her obsession with bread on the Pitching a Loaf podcast.

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