BAKED in Science E33: Emulsifier Replacement Technologies

There’s a lot of focus on solutions for emulsifier replacement. In fact, so much that you’re probably tired of hearing about it. But this is really a fascinating field, with some exciting benefits for baking. So to give you some fresh insight into the trend, I talk with two specialists from Europe about their latest research with enzymes!

Enzymatically-produced cyclodextrins for emulsifier replacement

First up is Dr. Helmut Reuscher, the technical director at WACKER. For more than 25 years, he’s been working with some truly mind-blowing molecules: cyclodextrins. Starting with starch sources such as corn or potatoes, a specific enzyme is used to take out bits of the starch helix and put them into a ring form. As a result, when water and fats are added, the cyclodextrin works as an emulsifier!

Dr. Reuscher goes into the science of this molecule, how it is used in baked goods, and why it’s unlike anything on the market.

Enzymes, directly used for emulsifier replacement

Next, to understand more about the science of enzymes and their use as emulsifiers and dough strengtheners, I talk with Iannis Samakidis.

An industry technological specialist with the global biotechnology company Novozymes, he explains how enzymes are being used in the baking industry. A few questions we cover are:

  • How can they extend shelf life?
  • How do the effect flour?
  • Why are they so specific?
  • Are they safe to bake with?
  • What are some different kinds?

If your interested in finding new solutions for your products, and want to dive into some deep baking science, you don’t want to miss this episode!

2019-06-25T09:03:02-07:00

2 Comments

  1. Khazer Aburajouh June 27, 2019 at 2:33 pm - Reply

    Dears
    It is interesting and looking forward to understand this new technology
    Appreciate your efforts in supporting this information
    Best regards

  2. Naima June 29, 2019 at 11:28 am - Reply

    Wow. Amazing.
    Will definitely investigate further.

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