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    • Profile PhotoCheryl
      Participant
      @cherylcxj
      Post count: 4

      Hi!

      May I know if soya lecithin is found naturally in soya beans or have to be commercially added?

      When i compare 2 brands of soy milk powder, one has soya lecithin listed as an ingredient among others while the other only lists soya beans & calcium carbonate as its ingredients… i’m not sure if the latter just assumes that soya lecithin is already found in soya beans?

      Also, given that the soy milk powder contains soya lecithin, how can i make use of this ingredient as an egg replacement? I.e. the amounts needed to replace the emulsifier property of an egg?

      Thanks!!! 🙂

    • Profile PhotoMark Floerke
      Keymaster
      @independant-consultant
      Post count: 223

      Hello @cherylcxj,

      Lecithin is a natural component of the soybean.  When soybeans are crushed for extracting the oil, lecithin was once a byproduct as part of the degumming and deodorizing process to produce clean tasting, transparent oil.

      When soy lecithin is listed as an ingredient in soymilk powder, it likely means that the particles have been spray coated with soybean lecithin, to improve dispersion in water.  Lecithin is both hydrophilic and lipophilic.  This means water loving and oil loving.  Different lecithins from different plant sources and or processing treatments, have differing hydrophilic and lipophilic balances, referred to as the HLB.  For dispersing in water to make soymilk, you will need a higher HLB on the hydrophilic end.

      To use soy milk or soy milk powder to replace eggs, will not likely provide you with sufficient lecithin to emulate the emulsification properties.  You might want to consider lecithinated soy flour, or go straight to lecithin.  Most lecithin is in liquid form, that is a yellowish brown color to golden, and very thick flowing and sticky.  Sunflower lecithin is slightly darker in color, with a clean flavor.  Canola, or Rape Seed lecithin is very dark in color, with a stronger flavor profile.  Functionality is generally the same amongst the different lecithins.  Some soy lecithins can be found in powder form that have been completely de-oiled.  They do cost more, and are much easier to handle in production, if the equipment to deal with liquid lecithin is not in place.

    • Profile PhotoCheryl
      Participant
      @cherylcxj
      Post count: 4

      Hi @independant-consultant (Mark) Thanks for your detailed reply!

      I’ve another question with regards to the point you mentioned on emulsification properties of eggs. What do these emulsification properties in eggs serve exactly (in baking)? And when replacing them with lecithin directly, how would it help in baking? Without replacing them, does it cause certain bakes to fail in one way?

       

      Thank you! 😉

    • Profile PhotoMark Floerke
      Keymaster
      @independant-consultant
      Post count: 223

      Hello @cherylcxj,

      Emulsification is sometimes a word that gets thrown out as a general functionality.  The basic principle of emulsification is modifying the surface tension between water and oil.  When combined, this is then an emulsion.  Like a creamy salad dressing, mayonnaise, hollandaise sauce, etc.  The modifying of the surface tension also allows for the formation of bubbles to capture gases.  Think about blowing soap bubbles.  Soap is a surfactant, which is the short name for surface active agent.

      Eggs contain protein in the egg white, to provide emulsification and aeration, and the egg yolk has lecithin, which provides emulsification to mix fat and water to a creamy consistency.  Eggs provide fluidity for mixing and batter flow, aeration from mixing, expansion during the baking process, and structure for the baked product when the eggs coagulates and cook.  There is a lot of complexity in replacing eggs for various baked goods.  Cookies tend to be among the easiest for functionality.  Replacing the nutritional protein is often part of the challenge in formulating today as well.

      Hope this is helpful.

      • Profile PhotoCheryl
        Participant
        @cherylcxj
        Post count: 4

        Thanks alot @independant-consultant! Your reply helped me understand eggs better 🙂

        So is lecithin in the egg yolks the main agent responsible for emulsification?

    • Profile PhotoMark Floerke
      Keymaster
      @independant-consultant
      Post count: 223

      Hello @cherylcxj – Yes, mostly when it comes to emulsifying oil, or fat, with liquids, like milk, or water.  Egg yolks will foam and provide some aeration as well.  When it comes to more aeration in batters and foam emulsification, like whipping whole eggs, etc., the egg white albumen protein provides the emulsification, but this is a matter of capturing air bubbles, and not oil and water emulsion.

      Using only lecithin will provide most of the emulsification properties of egg yolk, but not all.  Other thickeners and or binders are needed as part of the solution as well.

    • Profile PhotoCheryl
      Participant
      @cherylcxj
      Post count: 4

      @independant-consultant oh i see, so is that right to say that the emulsification is mostly provided by yolks (say around 90%), and the whites (10%)?

    • Profile PhotoMark Floerke
      Keymaster
      @independant-consultant
      Post count: 223

      Sorry for my long overdue response @cherylcxj.  There is no standing calculation, as it depends on other ingredients involved and desired outcomes.  Conceptually, for your needs in addressing the formulating initially, yes, that will help as a guide.

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