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    • Profile PhotoMark Floerke
      Keymaster
      @independant-consultant
      Post count: 223

      We have a question from the community about Mold:
      Hi there, I have heard several times that the type of contamination can be recognized by using the color of the mold. for example some experts say when you have white molds on the cake, the problem is your cake has high Moisture, or when you have gray to green molds its shows that your cake has contaminated after baking, maybe contacted with workers hand or machines.
      I would like to know your opinion on this matter. Thank you

      Our BAKERpedia page on mold: BAKERpedia Mold Page

    • Profile Photokhaled
      Participant
      @khaled
      Post count: 31

      i dont know about color but if the mold in outside of product it will be of hands worker or sunlight and if was inside cake it will be of recipe

    • Profile PhotoMark Floerke
      Keymaster
      @independant-consultant
      Post count: 223

      It is an old wives tale that colour can determine contamination.  Bacteria will grow and multiply whenever it has the hospitable conditions to do so.   No matter the appearance of the mold, it is contamination.  The cake has no mold on it coming out of the kill step (oven).  Checking product before mold is visible, is key to also determining where and when the contamination occurs.  Then controls can be implemented and monitored.
      Surface mold almost always has to do with hygienic conditions in handling.  It could be due to touch or even in the air.  Gloves protect our hands, but if the glove becomes contaminated you spread it around with the glove.  If fans are blowing cool air in, the area or on the product, any contamination in the air, dirty fan, etc. will blow on to the product.
      Ensuring the product cools sufficiently before packaging is also important.  The product surface may be normally dry enough that bacteria does not grow, but if packed to warm, moisture will condensate and provide bacteria the ability to multiply.

      If mold is on the interior crumb, before cutting or breaking open, then the internal temperature was not hot enough in baking.  The kill step was not completed.  If the interior crumb grows mold after cutting or breaking open, then there is most likely contact contamination.

    • Profile Photofatih
      Participant
      @foodspecialist
      Post count: 1

      So in this case , i sugges to all to positive air pressure (hepa60 filters!!) with sandwich pannels starting after oven till the packaging machines . And UV station just before enrobing or cooling . Also to check cooling tunnel temperature and dew point to control condensation is highly important .

    • Lin Carson, PhD
      Keymaster
      @lin-carson
      Post count: 41

      Thank you Fatih! Mark and I discussed it here on Friday Forum June 12th https://bakerpedia.com/bakertv/

    • Profile PhotoFaran
      Participant
      @faran
      Post count: 3

      Thank you everyone

    • Profile PhotoMark Floerke
      Keymaster
      @independant-consultant
      Post count: 223

      Great!  This is a topic that does keep coming up from time to time!  @faran; I am glad you find the information useful.

    • Profile Photoanurag
      Participant
      @anuragjha
      Post count: 1

      nice informative

    • Profile PhotoMark Floerke
      Keymaster
      @independant-consultant
      Post count: 223

      Thank you @anuragjha!  We are glad you are interested!

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