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    • Profile PhotoEvangeline
      Participant
      @chioma
      Post count: 1

      What quantity of lecithin and mono and diglyceride should be added to cake mix since they would be sold in dry/powdered form

    • Profile PhotoMark Floerke
      Keymaster
      @independant-consultant
      Post count: 223

      Hello @chioma,

      Before we can answer a quantity question, such as yours for cake emulsifiers, we need to ask ourselves why.  Why in terms of what functionality are you looking for or expecting?

      While Lecithin and mono diglycerides are both emulsifiers, they perform slightly different functions in different ways.  It also depends on how you intend to blend this with your dry mix?  In both cases they like to be blended with liquid oil or melted fat and dispersed in to the dry blend by spraying in.  lecithin can easily be mixed with oil, where as mono diglycerides is best melted in.  While not absolutely necessary, these methods provide the best performance.  Both can be obtained in a dry, powder like format.  Powdered lecithin is deoiled, and therefor more concentrated than liquid lecithin.  Distilled mono diglycerides are in a powdery format that blends in dry mixes quite easily.

      Here are some links where you read more about the ingredients:

      Mono and diglycerides: https://bakerpedia.com/ingredients/mono-and-diglycerides/

      Lecithin: https://bakerpedia.com/ingredients/lecithin/

      About 4% of the fat in your formula is a good place to start your testing.  How much to use in the end  will depend on the functionality results you want to achieve, and of course cost.

      Please let us know how you progress and how we can be of further help.

    • Profile PhotoAparna
      Participant
      @aparna
      Post count: 2

      Hello,

      I am using PGMS, DMG in my egg-based premix as an emulsification system.  I have tried the 1: 0.4 ratio of PGMS a7 DMG, Sugar and Flour quantity is the same in formulation & baking powder % is 1.78%. The prepared cake whiteness is less as compared to other brands available in the market.

    • Profile PhotoMark Floerke
      Keymaster
      @independant-consultant
      Post count: 223

      Hello @aparna,
      If you are not obtaining the desired whiteness, look to your ingredients first.  In North America chlorinate soft wheat flour is used to make brilliant white cake crumbs.  This flour if extra fine, and bleached very white by the chlorination.  The other thing is eggs.  White Cake will have a high proportion of egg albumen.  In a commercial mix this will be as a dry component in the mix.  The end user add water and some whole egg, but less whole egg  than is used in yellow cake or similar mixes.
      Provide us with more detail or let us know if this answers your question. Thanks.

       

    • Profile PhotoAparna
      Participant
      @aparna
      Post count: 2

      Hello sir

      I am using  Non-chlorinated wheat flour to prepare cake premix. The End-user will add 14 Nos. of eggs and 20 g of cake gel for 1 kg premix.

      I am developing this premix for the economical range.

    • Profile PhotoMark Floerke
      Keymaster
      @independant-consultant
      Post count: 223

      Hello @aparna,

      I do not know what your cake gel is, but if it contains lecithin, or other ingredients that impart color, that could be a cause.  Of course the 14 whole eggs will make the cake very yellow.  White cake is often 1/2 egg white and 1/2 whole eggs.  So if you are going by egg count, then 7 whole egg plus 12 egg whites, might be a suggestion.

      If you have access to bleached or chlorinated flour, it will help provide much more whiteness to the crumb.  Wheat flour is naturally creamy in color.

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