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    • Profile PhotoLuke
      Participant
      @avogadro
      Post count: 9

      Why is elongation of grain cells a sought after characteristic? It’s in the AACC guidelines for scoring experimental bread, and I can find research that says increase of feret diameter of cells is a good thing. Does anybody have an explanation or is able to point to a text that explains the characteristics of crumb structure?

    • Profile PhotoLuke
      Participant
      @avogadro
      Post count: 9

      For posterities sake:

      having done more research, this is what I know so far. As far as I understand, cell elongation seems to be an indicator of a bread reaching it’s full expansion capacity. Cell elongation is distortion of the bubbles within the gluten matrix, the fact the distortion exists as opposed to it simply collapsing shows that the bread can withstand the said deformation and expand fully. Good papers to start off with are:

      Galliard, T., 1990. The microstructure and gas retention of bread dough. Journal of Cereal Science 12, 15–24

      Rogers, D.E., Day, D.D., Olewnik, M.C., 1995. Development of an objective crumb-grain measurement. Cereal Foods World 40, 498–501.

      Gandikota, S., & MacRitchie, F. (2005). Expansion capacity of doughs: methodology and applications. Journal of Cereal Science, 42(2), 157–163.

       

    • Lin Carson, PhD
      Keymaster
      @lin-carson
      Post count: 41

      Hey Luke, I’m not so sure, but I’m bringing in an AACC cell specialist on this one. He’s in the process of getting in here to answer your question.

    • Profile PhotoStephen Pike
      Participant
      @calibre-control
      Post count: 2

      Cell elongation increases resilience and strength of the baked product.

      Additionally in 4-piece moulding it will orientate the dough to ensure cell alignment within the loaf produces a product with a high number of cells with a narrow range of small diameters.

    • Profile PhotoZziwa
      Participant
      @kamos-bakehouse-ltd
      Post count: 49

      At which level is this cell elongation mr pike?

      At which level is the elongation your talking about?

      Cell elongation occurs from fermentation to the the intial minutes in the oven ?

      Could you please shed more light

    • Profile PhotoStephen Pike
      Participant
      @calibre-control
      Post count: 2

      My experience is with plant bread where the dough has passed through a sheeting and curling process is order to align cells in a specific direction as required by the baker.

      In the attached images taken using C-Cell you can see an example of a typical rye bread showing the effect of passing the dough through a lamination process where the dough ball is flattened then rolled up and dropped into the tin. The red lines indicate the direction of elongation (we measure both X and Y axis for every cell in the image) and the green lines indicate the vector (which should all point towards one central point)

      The Net Cell Elongation for this image is 1.62

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